For 91 Days in Oviedo

Adventures, anecdotes and advice from three months exploring Asturias
For 91 Days we lived in Oviedo, the capital of Asturias. An ancient, noble city surrounded by unbelievable nature, Oviedo provided a wonderful base for three months of hiking, sight-seeing and culture.
Whether you're planning your own journey to Asturias, or are just interested in seeing what makes it such a special region, our articles and photographs should help you out.

Benito Jerónimo Feijóo

Though he was born in Galicia, Benito Jerónimo Feijóo spent the bulk of his life in Oviedo. One of Spain's foremost enlightenment thinkers, the intellectual, religious and philosophical works of Feijóo had reverberations throughout the world. The Benedictine monk died in 1769 at the ripe old age of 89, and is buried in the Iglesia de Santa María de la Corte, near the plaza which bears his name.

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The Plaza de España and Francisco Franco

I love living in Spain for a lot of reasons: siestas, wine, crazy parties, friendly people, the beautiful language. Also, I'm fascinated by history, and Spain is full of it. The Spanish Civil War is of particular interest; the ultimate left-right clash, the workers against the privileged, the cohesion of the Francoists and the suicidal splintering of the liberals, the cowardice of the world's democracies, the brutality shown by foreign fascist powers, the self-sacrifice of the International Brigades and of course the war's terrible, soul-crushing end. In this movie, the bad guys won. It's utterly captivating.

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Mirador del Fito

The road between Colunga and Arriondas winds through the Sueve mountain range. Midway through the drive, is a viewpoint called the Mirador del Fito, which offers an incredible view of the ocean, valleys and the Picos de Europa in the distance.

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The Asturian Hymn

The official Anthem of Asturias, popularly elected in the 1890s, is a curious song. It's unlike any "national" anthem I've ever heard. There's nothing grand about it, and it seems more suited to a traditional dance than a national statement of identity. But, here, you be the judge:

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